Sugar Addiction and Your Instincts




“My instincts are causing my craving for sugar and fat, because my unconscious mind thinks those things are good for me”.

When that simple truth finally sank into my thick skull, it really felt as though a huge emotional weight had fallen off my shoulders. For years I had been eating in a way that was self-destructive, and I felt as though I couldn’t help it – “something else” took over when I was faced with a pan of cinnamon rolls with cream cheese frosting.

And, since that “something else” was obviously me, I was angry at myself a lot of the time. (Especially if I ate the whole pan of rolls, which I did far more often than I want to admit.)

But my anger didn’t help much. It just meant I ate too much, and then felt bad about myself because of it.

When I finally realized that my “something else” part, my instinctive mind, was actually trying to do the right thing it really began to change my life.

It’s very much as though a three-year old picked all of his mommy’s prize begonias the morning before the flower show because he wanted to bring his mommy a pretty bouquet. Sure, you get frustrated – and might even want to cry. But how can you get angry when the little guy had such good intentions?

Your instinctive mind actually has good intentions when it makes you want sugar and fat.

It actually thinks that these things are necessary for your survival. And they are, in the tiny quantities that would have been available a million years ago. So why should we be angry at ourselves when we discover that we’ve just eaten something fattening?

How would it change your life if you didn’t have to be angry at yourself because you ate a doughnut just a few minutes after you promised yourself you wouldn’t? Just letting go of the inner judgment would be a great relief, wouldn’t it? ….

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